Tag Archives: Employee Benefits

Your Competitors May Not Be Who You Think


This past week there were two press releases related to the benefits brokerage business that were fairly significant. One of them was picked up by the industry publications, generated some kudos on LinkedIn, and created some noise in the benefits community. Brokers were talking about it and many emailed me or called me to see what I thought.

The other one went mostly unnoticed in the benefits world. The industry pubs didn’t pick it up and I did not get a single phone call asking my opinion. Yet, from my perspective, the second press release will have a greater impact on the average benefits broker than the first.

This contrast made me think of a quote I keep on my wall that reminds me to not be complacent. It is from Jim Keyes, the former CEO of Blockbuster Video, who once said:

“Neither RedBox nor Netflix are even on the radar screen in terms of competition,” he said. “It’s more Wal-Mart and Apple.”

We all know how that turned out.

The first press release announced the merger of 20+ benefits firms, many who I know. While this is noteworthy, I am not sure that the world is any different today because of it. Yesterday they were wearing one uniform and today they are wearing another. They are the same people, in the same locations, and until there is some other new big announcement they are probably doing pretty much the same thing today that they were doing yesterday.

From a competitive standpoint, I am pretty sure this event won’t change the landscape much. Most brokers are already competing with larger firms that use their size and resources as their competitive advantage. Some brokers may even think this is good for them competitively because their market just lost another boutique firm and the competition of local boutique firms just got smaller. In reality, not much has changed until someone brings something new to the market.

The second press release was from a company called Namely. Namely raised an additional $50 million in capital bringing their total capital raise to $157.8 million. (Source: Venture Beat January 5, 2017) Concurrently, Namely also announced the following:

“Namely also announced today a new benefits offering called the Namely Health Advantage, which groups together similar companies to offer their employees health benefits at preferred rates.”

What makes this significant is that Namely has brought something new to the market. They have developed an engaging HR-Benefits-Payroll platform promising simplicity and ease of use. They also act as a benefits broker, creating a single source technology and service offering to employers. And as can be seen from the quote above, they created a new health insurance offering for their clients.

Namely claims to have 650 clients totaling 120,000 employees which would be an average client size of around 185 employees. Unlike companies like Zenefits, that targets much smaller employers (< 50 employees), Namely targets mid-market employers ranging from 100 – 1000 employees. From a competitive standpoint, this is the sweet spot for many benefits firms.

If you do the math and assume they are generating revenue at a $25 per employee per month rate, then their annual revenue would be in the range of $36 million. This is a real rough guess. Even if I am off by $10 million it would not be bad for a company that was founded in 2012. That would make them one of the fastest growing benefits brokers in the country. Though I am sure they would not classify themselves as such.

In 2015 there was $2.4 billion invested in HR Technology type companies. And as one industry analyst said, “Do you know what they will do with that money in 2016 and 2017”? Spend it. They will spend it on marketing and sales. They will have Ads on LinkedIn and Google. They will be at all the HR trade shows. They will be everywhere marketing to your customers and prospects. Namely has even had TV commercials on Fox News. I don’t see many brokers advertising on TV.

I could imagine asking the average benefits broker about their competition and it would not surprise me if they responded as follows:

“Neither Namely nor Zenefits are even on the radar screen in terms of competition,” he said. “It’s more Gallagher, Mercer, and USI.”

You may not have recognized this competition yet. Many brokers say they never lost a case to Namely or similar companies. What they don’t know is how many prospects they lost to these firms. How many employers looking for solutions found Namely but did not find you? How many prospects would respond to their value proposition versus yours? Do you even know what their value proposition is?

There is a way to meet and beat this new competition. But is takes work, planning, investment, and risk taking. Or maybe these firms are really nothing to worry about. Ask Jim Keyes what he thinks.

It’s a Saturday night and I should go. I could end this article by saying I am going to be watching a movie on Netflix tonight but playoff football is on, and anyone who knows me would know I am lying. But if you want to learn about these new competitors and what you can do to compete with them, check out our latest webinar titled, “The Future of Human Capital Management and Benefits” by clicking on this link.

Webinar Invite – Taking Benefits and HR to the Next Level in 2017


I know, another webinar invite. This is a really good one though. If you are a benefits broker I guarantee this is worth 45 minutes of your time. Here is the bottom-line with this webinar. We have been delivering technology solutions to both brokers and employers for 16 years now and have seen gaps in the market over that time that are actually being magnified now as the market changes. Many brokers and most employers are often not recognizing those gaps. We think that by filling those gaps you can take an employer’s HR from a 3 to a 9 and improve a broker’s operation in similar ways.

In this webinar, we will share some but not all the secrets. We then introduce a model that we think is quite unique.

The dates are: January 5th, 10th and 12th at 12:00 – 1:00 Eastern Time

If you are a broker and have an interest in attending feel free to click on the link below to register. If we don’t know who you are we may give you a call before approving access to the webinar. Thanks.

Register Here

Beware the Benefits Blind Spot


In the most recent election the one thing we learned was that the media, and probably most Americans, had a blind spot. For some reason, they did not want to see or hear what many Americans were thinking. And maybe, for some reason, people did not want to say what they were thinking, until that is, when they went to vote. Now this is not a political discussion as I am sure many are tired of political debates by now. But this does remind me of an article I wrote this spring titled, “Two health care stories – Which do you believe?”, that is worth bringing up again. In the article, I wrote about two stories being told about how to solve the health care problem in America. The problem is the noise created by one side was drowning out the other, creating a benefits blind spot.

Now that Trump has won the election the articles and chatter about how Trump is going to reform healthcare is growing at a rapid pace. The noise is getting loud again. Yet, as I read some of the articles, blogs, and chat going on, I am sensing that the benefits blind spot still exists. It may be getting even worse now that the Hillary plan of a public option appears to be in the rearview mirror. Having such a blind spot, when running a business, or when running for President, can have negative consequences.

I don’t recall where I read it but I once read that one of the keys to marketing and messaging is to try to say what the buyer is thinking. And buyers don’t always tell you what they are thinking, even when you ask. So, you need to try to understand the buyer. To do this you need to ask and answer some tough questions, as if you were in their shoes.

What do employers want? Do they want to be worrying about whether they just hired a person who has a wife at home pregnant with triplets? Do they want to be telling their employees their costs are going up again every year? When I spoke at a conference about Private Exchanges I asked some employers why they would be interested in a Private Exchange. You know what the answer was. They thought a Private Exchange would get them out of the health insurance risk business. It was an out for them, at least they thought so.

What do employees want? Or maybe we should be asking, what do consumers want?What is more important for most people, broader access or lower costs? Do they want portable insurance? Do they want penalties for not participating in a wellness program? Do they want national healthcare?

When you think back on the Presidential campaign there were signs everywhere of a potential Trump victory. Trump rallies were like sold-out rock concerts. When I was in Florida on Election Day I mentioned to my wife about how many Trump signs we saw and how few Hillary ones there were. The Trump campaign apparently saw things most didn’t. In the final days, he was campaigning in states like Michigan where most people thought he was going to lose. Maybe the signs were there but people either did not want to see them or were simply not looking. It appears Trump was delivering a message many people wanted to hear.

This may be happening in the healthcare market right now. It is not just ObamaCare that is broken. ObamaCare could be an unintentional distraction that may be creating a blind spot as to what is going on. There may be a silent majority that wants a different type of healthcare system. And they won’t tell their broker or insurance carrier because in their eyes you may be part of the “establishment”. And the establishment often does not want change.

To prepare your business for the future one needs to understand what the future will look like. To do so will require that you eliminate the blind spots. I have shared my personal views about where I think the market is going several times in the past. The Trump election has changed it a little but I too have to be careful so that I don’t bias my own views. If the healthcare market goes to where I think it is going I believe there are big opportunities for those that provide value in the new market. But what about those that don’t change. Well, it was Barack Obama that said clearly, “Elections have consequences.”

What is the Secret to Your Success?


I have been writing blogs, conducting webinars, and speaking at conferences for some time. They say this is what you should do to market yourself or your company. Personally, I simply like writing and speaking. I also enjoy an intelligent discussion with educated people. One thing I have always struggled with is divulging too much information. Everyone says that you should blog and tweet, and do whatever else to get your message out, but you know what, I am beginning to think that this is not always a good idea.

I always refer to “when I was an athlete” which these days seems to be getting further and further in the rearview mirror. But when I was an athlete we always depended on secrets. In football, we would never show the other team our playbook. We would run play-action fakes to make the defense think it was a run when we were passing. When pitching, my goal was to fool the batter. I certainly wouldn’t announce to the batter when I was throwing a fastball versus a curve. Fooling the opposition was a part of the strategy. It was something we did to improve our chances of winning.

In business Steve Jobs would fire someone who would disclose their secrets. Apple went way out of their way to keep whatever it was they were doing secret. In technology, everyone has secrets.

The formula for Coca-Cola was created in 1886 yet only a few people know the formula. In fact, the formula is stored in a vault in Atlanta. And Kentucky Fried Chicken has two different companies create half of their herbs and spices recipe each so that neither one knows the whole formula. I don’t think either will be writing a blog disclosing their recipes.

When it comes to business I often refer to a quote from Mark Cuban that says, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it”. Peter Thiel thinks that the key to a successful business is discovering a “secret” that few others have yet to discover. I agree with them.

So if I were to ask a person what they think the secret to their future success will be I would not expect to get an honest answer. Yes, you will get an answer like “hard work”, or “treating your employees well”, or some other comment that sounds nice that everyone uses. But the key may be in their secrets. Because business is a very competitive environment and to win you need the element of surprise. It works in sports and is critical in war, so why would it not be in business?

I think there are some secrets yet to be uncovered in the benefits business. Secrets that maybe can make the difference in the future of one’s business. But you won’t find those secrets in some blog. You won’t read about them in some industry magazine. You won’t hear them at some broker association meeting or in some little broker group. And those that are tweeting all day probably don’t have something valuable to tweet because if it was that valuable they wouldn’t be tweeting it.

You shouldn’t expect to find any secrets in this blog either. Because the good secrets – the ones that can bring in customers at a rapid pace – the ones that take weeks or months of thinking and years of planning and execution will not be found in the public domain. If you want to find the secrets you need to start looking in the right places. Sometimes those places are staring you right in the face but you don’t see them because your thinking has blinded your vision. In fact, close your eyes. And open your mind. Challenge your thinking. And stop looking on the outside because the answers will come from within. Because to win the game you may need to strike out the next batter. And it may not come from the 92-mph fastball. It may come from the 75-mph curve.

Is Your Benefits Firm Built to Handle a Benefits Bear Market?


I often reference a quote from Mark Cuban that says, “Everyone’s a genius in a bull market.” When you think about the benefits business it has really been a bull market since I have been in the business, which is 30 years now. Everything seems to be going up, up, up, regardless of the quality of the product or service. Benefits brokers have benefited significantly, getting medical inflation raises for years. Admittedly they have also been adding more services, often at no cost. But this is behavior you see in a bull market. It is easy when the math is in your favor. However, do we even know what a benefits firm would look like in a bear market?

I know what a benefits bull market looks like. Companies good and bad are thriving. Money is spent fairly recklessly. Wages are often above the averages for similar jobs in other industries. There are trips and more trips. Everything is great. Those are the good parts.

Bull markets can also have some negative effects. Weaknesses in one’s business or value proposition aren’t easily recognized. Inefficiency is hidden. Complacency can creep into the organization. There can be a failure to recognize competitive threats. Common business practices aren’t practiced. And a belief that one’s world will never change can blind one’s vision of the future or reality.

But what does a bear market in benefits look like? What can cause a bear market? Commission compression? A move to fee for service? Government intervention including changes in tax laws? Obamacare collapsing? The budget deficit getting higher with rising health care costs being a big contributor? The MLR? Hospitals getting squeezed? Higher deductibles and employee contributions? All these factors appear to be present right now, favoring a need for change. Could it signal a coming bear market?

Warren Buffet loves bear markets because he thinks there are deals to be made. And it is bear markets that allow the cream to rise to the top. Bear markets eliminate a lot of competition. But do we really know who the superstars are? Can we tell the real genius from the bull market only genius? And what does a bear market benefits firm look like? Without really having been in a bear market I am not sure what one really looks like.

If a benefits bear market hits there will be opportunities. Opportunities for those who have anticipated changes; for those who built a model to sustain over the long haul; for firms whose infrastructure can adapt quickly to change; for those who have worked hard to expand their non-medical revenue reducing some business risk; for those who have differentiated their value proposition not by giving things away but by delivering products or services of value that an employer would pay for. Think about that one for a second. Of all those “value added services” a firm provides, what would an employer pay for and what would they pay? Would they pay anything at all?

Much like my financial advisor I don’t have that crystal ball. And it is hard to run a business when things you don’t have any control over can cause you chaos overnight. But hoping the benefits world doesn’t change isn’t a strategy. You also can’t put your head in the sand either. Recognizing business threats is a critical component of any business. Even Apple assesses business threats. So don’t let the first benefits bear market get you down. Some good planning can reap great rewards, even when the world changes. Or maybe we will have a bull market forever. Place your bets!

Webinar Invite – Growing Your Benefits Business by Leaps and Bounds


How does a broker go from 5 employees in their benefits firm in 2005 to 60 today without an acquisition? How does another go from 5 to 200 in just 8 years? Or another that generated $40 PEPM in addition to commission on a single account?

In this webinar we will get into the details of how some firms are skyrocketing while others struggle. We will show you the details of what these firms did to generate rapid growth, and show you how you can do the same.

This is a no-holds-barred webinar. If you want me to tell you what I think you are already thinking, then this is not for you. I am going to tell it like it is.

In this webinar we will answer the following:
• What are these brokers doing that is different?
• How they generate up to $20 PEPM above the regular commission?
• Why their model sustains any changes in healthcare reform?
• What is the difference between faking it and making it?
• The 3-year plan to a better future?

This webinar is a culmination of all others we have done. It puts things in a nice neat package and explains things in a different way. If you want to learn this formula, please click here to register.

Register HERE

The dates are September 9,13,and 16th at 12 noon eastern time.

This is for benefits brokers only.

How well do you know your customers?


In today’s environment where information is readily available and leveraging the web and mobile to provide service is an expectation, personalizing that service is also expected. When I buy an airline ticket I am asked how I would like to be informed of any changes (email, text, phone call). When I check into my preferred hotel chain they have my preferences and personalize my service. For some reason this type of personalized service hasn’t become the standard in the benefits business, or at least to the level of other industries.

I often reference the Wellness Newsletter I got from my broker giving me tips about pre-natal care. As a 54-year-old male this is not relevant and the email itself not only did not address my needs but in some way reflects poorly on my broker. It made me think he is really not that organized. Not only was the newsletter not relevant to me, but what my broker also does not know is that I already subscribe to a Wellness Newsletter directly from another online company. This newsletter sends me the information that relates specifically to someone my gender and age and is delivered at the frequency I want in the method that I want. I did not need a Wellness Newsletter.

On another occasion a broker I know provided an online HR Library to the HR person of an employer where the outcome was not what was expected. This HR person was on a committee for a company that also provided HR content on the web and she found many flaws in the product the broker delivered. It started with good intentions, but the outcome was not what the broker intended. Should the broker have known the HR person was on such a committee?

I can go on and on. People putting in enrollment systems to clients that already owned one but didn’t know it? Building benefit websites for employers that already had a regularly used intranet. I am not just pointing the finger here at others. In my own organization we struggle with the same issues when serving our clients.

All this reminds me of some stats I saw from a book published by Jack McKean titled, “Information Masters: Secrets of the Customer Race.” In the book he cites the following:

“Only 2% of the knowledge that organizations have about their customers is actually used.”

“Only 5% of the body of knowledge about a client is available digitally and indeed only 20% of the knowledge is recorded at all.”

What is amazing is that this book was published in 1999. The stats may not be the same today but it in many cases it is close to the truth. And of course this is not reflective of you and me. We are better than this.

It takes a lot of work to create a personalized service experience. You need technology to store and manage the data. You need a methodology to gather information and keep it current. You need processes in place to automate certain functions. You need people either on staff or through an outside resource to plan and execute such a strategy. It is a herculean effort.

In today’s environment most brokers provide service to the employer which could include HR, finance or the business owner. This has its own challenges but at least gathering information to personalize the service for a few people is somewhat manageable. Imagine the effort if we move to a consumer centric world where the services need to be personalized for the employee. What is the broker’s role in this environment? What would be the cost in time, technology, and resources, to deliver the experience consumers expect in today’s world.

From the employer’s perspective they have the same challenges. The expectations of how they are going to support their employees is changing. The needs of a 26 year-old with significant college debt are much different from a middle-aged employee preparing for retirement who may have health issues. These employers may not have the resources, technology, or capital to move their HR to this new level.

Many brokers say they provide such services but I have not seen it. Many do provide great service but not in the personalized way I am talking about. Relative to their peers in the current environment they may superior. But what happens when someone comes along and raises the bar? This happens often in many industries.

As someone in the technology consulting business I am seeing firms behind the scenes beginning to develop new models of service. Models that don’t exist today in the benefits world that can raise the bar. And it can raise it in a way that gives these firms a distinct competitive advantage that is not easily duplicated. Like providing benefits advice to a millennial on a Saturday afternoon via video conferencing. Some of these firms are traditional brokers but others are coming in from outside the industry. Those outside the industry love disrupting current business models. The health care business, and by extension the benefits industry, is a primary target because the capital running through it is so high it invites disruption. People want a piece of a very large pie.

Many brokers rely on relationships and are pretty sure their clients are loyal. I once saw a statistic that said that most companies think about 80% of their clients would be loyal. When employers were asked how loyal they were to their vendors the answer was 20%. This is a huge disconnect between perception and reality. One way a relationship can be severed is when a competitor brings in a better idea or better service. Companies like Zenefits displaced $63 million in commission business from many brokers with loyal customers. One told me he lost a 20-year relationship to Zenefits. So new ideas can be powerful.

I am not going to pretend to have all the answers. And I certainly look in the mirror when writing this because I am somewhat talking to myself too. But I have seen technology and models that can start the process to personalizing service for employers and employees. I have spoken to some companies that have started the process. I have seen the revenue models too. I don’t know when this “tipping point” will happen, but it will, because it is possible and the market wants it. And the opportunity is there for those who want to provide such services, but one must start. So my advice is to start. And start today because it is a big challenge.