Tag Archives: Benefits Technology

What is the Speed of Your Benefits Business


I often wonder why the benefits world is so slow to advance new ideas and new technology. I have been in the business for over 30 years yet have seen very little evolution relative to other industries. In my personal life, almost everything has evolved. The way I do my banking, communicate with friends and businesses associates, book an airline ticket, turn lights on and off in my home, pay at Starbucks, or get around a city, have all changed. Things are easier. Yet, for the most part, the benefits business is almost still the same as it was when I got in the business in 1986. Up to this point lack of change has not significantly impacted those in the business. I think that is about to change.

I started my career in finance at General Electric where the CEO, Jack Welch, was good at putting things in perspective. One quote has stuck with me and that is as follows:

“If the rate of change on the outside exceeds the rate of change on the inside, then the end is near.”                                  Jack Welch

Since I have been running a business I have heeded that advice. We try hard to change with the times and it isn’t always easy. I would say it is never easy. But we haven’t sat still.

With all the attention to health care and health insurance in the U.S. I have spent a great deal of time researching the market so that I can make an educated guess as to where the market is headed. What I have seen is that the outside world, (outside of the current benefits market including carriers, brokers, TPA’s etc..) is moving much faster than the inside world. If you only looked on the inside; at broker and carrier conferences; read benefits magazines or blogs; or listen to one’s buddy in the business; you would miss what is going on outside. The outsiders don’t care about the insiders. Unlike the past 30 years, new technologies, new business models, significant capital, a populace looking for better solutions, and government debt that is unsustainable, are the catalysts for change that exist today and not at any time in the past. Things are different.

A changing health care market is right under everyone’s nose yet many don’t see it. The Apple Watch, an Amazon Echo, Bitcoin and Blockchain technology, Artificial Intelligence and machine learning (highlighted on 60 minutes) all can be the foundation for huge changes. Never mind simple things like video conferencing, online chat and text messaging, and bots.

A few years ago, some benefits organizations started pushing Private Exchanges as some new idea. I wasn’t buying it. I sold similar plans in 1987. Many think they are offering some game changing idea, but most are simply different packaging of the same thing.

In the benefits business, small brokers may not have the capital to make the changes needed to keep up with the outside world. Many larger firms appear to be building moats around their businesses hoping the outside world won’t touch them. And as the old saying goes, it takes a long time for a big ship to change its course. The outsiders will just go around or over the moat anyway.
One doesn’t need to invent everything to have a sustainable business in a changing market. You may be able leverage the tools or resources invented by others to compete effectively. But all this change is not easy. Yet we all know that “Hope” is not a strategy.

So, look around and not just at your competitors or at some broker conference. When your Apple watch gives you your pulse. When you talk to your Amazon Echo. When you video chat with your son or daughter. When you turn on the air conditioning in your house from work. Wonder why this isn’t happening regularly in the benefits business. Is the outside moving faster than your inside? If so, well hoping Jack Welch is wrong is probably not a good strategy.

The Southwest Approach to HR and Benefits Technology


Recently I flew from Boston to Ft. Lauderdale on a Boeing 737 with engines made by General Electric. I had a window seat, Wi-Fi, and I got a Diet Coke on the plane. I reached my destination comfortably and on-time. A few weeks prior to that I flew on a Boeing 737 with GE Engines from Boston to Chicago. I had a window seat, Wi-Fi, and a Diet Coke. I was much less comfortable and my flight was 45 minutes late. Boeing was terrible on my Chicago trip.

What is wrong with my last statement? The experience I had on my first flight was from Southwest Airlines and the second was Delta. The technology these airlines used was, for the most part, exactly the same. The experience however, was much different. Boeing was not responsible for my expected outcome. Southwest and Delta were.

Southwest entered a business with non-proprietary technology and managed to shake-up the industry and become one of the most profitable airlines year-in and year out. They looked at every part of the airline business process and changed things that got in the way of achieving their main objective. This lowered costs, made flying more affordable, and improved outcomes while enabling them to be profitable. They didn’t really invent anything. They simply applied new processes to a business that was ripe for a change.

The same opportunities exist in many industries where the technology is simply the tool. Company A creates a product and other companies either use it for their business as Southwest does or they resell, implement, and service some technology. The differentiator in the end isn’t the technology, but the services around the technology.

In the HR and Benefits business many service providers including benefits brokers seem to be missing this concept. They think they have to bring employers the best “aircraft” versus understanding the service model needed to provide better outcomes. The result of focusing on the technology is a lack of understanding of the services.

Another misperception when it comes to technology is the cost. In many industries, the cost of the technology is small compared to the cost of making it run the right way and supporting it. When I fly from Boston to Chicago the majority of the costs are for things other than the aircraft. I saw a statistic that said the cost of the aircraft itself on a per person basis was around $30 per flight.

When it comes to HR and Benefits technology these same rules apply. The cost of the technology often pales in comparison to the cost of implementing, supporting, and operating the system. Yet many are still focused on the cost of the technology. I regularly replace low-cost benefits enrollment systems that actually drive costs up because of all the necessary workarounds because the technology lacked functionality. If I need to fly from Boston to Chicago a single engine plane would not be the optimum technology.

So, when it comes to Benefits technology you must ask yourself, are you Boeing or are you Southwest? Or are you neither? Are companies like ADP, Paychex, bswift, or Namely, more like Southwest or are they Boeing? Or are they both? Maybe trying to be both is the problem.

The HR and Benefits technology business, and maybe the benefits business as a whole could use a little Southwest. While your competitors are looking for that better jet the opportunity to help the employer in their journey is much greater. You can even drive down costs more by understanding the process than beating up some technology vendor. The result can be lower costs and better outcomes. Who doesn’t want that?

“Alexa – What is my deductible?”


When it comes to adoption of technology simple is most often better than complex. Steve Jobs and Apple went to great lengths to make their products simple. Without user adoption products fail. Current technology trends continue the move towards simplicity with the advent of artificial intelligence and personal assistant tools like Amazon’s Echo and the Google Home. Before you know it, these tools will enter the benefits world. The question is, who is going to be first and best? And if I am a benefits broker how does this impact my business?

While many brokers are aware of the vendors that call on them or have tradeshow booths at industry conferences, I believe the benefits technology race is going to heat up with new competition entering the market. These new competitors see the market opportunity to automate large segments of our economy including health insurance and health care. You may have heard of some of these companies like Microsoft, Google, Salesforce.com, and Apple. This would be in addition to current leaders such as ADP and Paychex. The stakes of the game will change and the price of entry, from an investment standpoint, is in the hundreds of millions of dollars. Those with the capital will quickly outpace those with less capital.

Don’t be surprised when you start to see major mergers and acquisitions in the HR and Benefits space. Could Microsoft buy Ultimate Software? Why not? They already purchased LinkedIn and recently hinted at getting deeper into the HR space.

When I look at products like the Amazon Echo and Google Home I see products that have very quickly grabbed market share with high rates of adoption. My wife, who is not an early adopter of technology, quickly became a user of Google Home. Why? Because it is easy. Would she have a better understanding of her health insurance if she could simply ask Google? Absolutely!

Benefits technology, on the other hand, has not had broad adoption by employees. Yes, employers have bought systems or brokers have given them away, but when you look at utilization on the employee side it is abysmal. I believe the reason for this is because there is not enough value as a stand-alone solution to generate broad adoption. Keep in mind that the majority of people hardly use their health care in a given year so there is little need to access such a system. I don’t know about you but I can hardly remember the login to my computer never mind something I may not use for 6 months.

The next generation of technology in the HR and Benefits area is going to have broader and “everyday” value, while being much easier to use. Market leading vendors, especially those with a great deal of capital, will invest in the latest technologies to try and win the technology race and gain more customers. And before you know it you will be saying the following:

“Alexa, is Dr. John Smith from Boston in the Blue Cross network?”

“Ok Google, request Friday off from work?”

“Hey Siri, how much does the average office visit cost?”

“Alexa, what is the balance of my 401k?”

“Ok Google, transfer $500 from my savings to checking?”

The advancement of technology and artificial intelligence has enabled many to have more personalized user experiences. Your Amazon Echo will “get to know you”. Maybe in the near future your doctor will get to know you a little better too.

Many benefits brokers have chosen some technology vendor with a mission of putting as many clients on the system as possible. This is a risky position competitively as more advanced solutions from highly capitalized companies come along. I don’t know many sales people or business owners in any industry who like running around with the 8th best product. Even more so when it is not necessary. The market and your customers do not care if you have invested thousands of dollars on some technology that may quickly fall out of favor.

One should take the advice of Jack Welch, ex- CEO of General Electric who once said,

“If the rate of change on the outside exceeds the rate of change on the inside, the end is near.”

For those that have purchased the Amazon Echo or Google Home you don’t have to look far to see that the outside world is changing faster than the inside. The health insurance and health care industries often feel like they are moving at a snail’s pace. Private Exchanges were lauded as change when they really are a reincarnation of cafeteria plans from the 80’s.

With the Trump administration, changes in health insurance legislation may create a shift that empowers the consumer. The industry may need an army of people on the front lines to help the industry move to a whole new paradigm. The vendors will need help and the employers and employees will need it too. The technology is there. Alexa is ready. Are you?

What is the Secret to Your Success?


I have been writing blogs, conducting webinars, and speaking at conferences for some time. They say this is what you should do to market yourself or your company. Personally, I simply like writing and speaking. I also enjoy an intelligent discussion with educated people. One thing I have always struggled with is divulging too much information. Everyone says that you should blog and tweet, and do whatever else to get your message out, but you know what, I am beginning to think that this is not always a good idea.

I always refer to “when I was an athlete” which these days seems to be getting further and further in the rearview mirror. But when I was an athlete we always depended on secrets. In football, we would never show the other team our playbook. We would run play-action fakes to make the defense think it was a run when we were passing. When pitching, my goal was to fool the batter. I certainly wouldn’t announce to the batter when I was throwing a fastball versus a curve. Fooling the opposition was a part of the strategy. It was something we did to improve our chances of winning.

In business Steve Jobs would fire someone who would disclose their secrets. Apple went way out of their way to keep whatever it was they were doing secret. In technology, everyone has secrets.

The formula for Coca-Cola was created in 1886 yet only a few people know the formula. In fact, the formula is stored in a vault in Atlanta. And Kentucky Fried Chicken has two different companies create half of their herbs and spices recipe each so that neither one knows the whole formula. I don’t think either will be writing a blog disclosing their recipes.

When it comes to business I often refer to a quote from Mark Cuban that says, “The best way to predict the future is to invent it”. Peter Thiel thinks that the key to a successful business is discovering a “secret” that few others have yet to discover. I agree with them.

So if I were to ask a person what they think the secret to their future success will be I would not expect to get an honest answer. Yes, you will get an answer like “hard work”, or “treating your employees well”, or some other comment that sounds nice that everyone uses. But the key may be in their secrets. Because business is a very competitive environment and to win you need the element of surprise. It works in sports and is critical in war, so why would it not be in business?

I think there are some secrets yet to be uncovered in the benefits business. Secrets that maybe can make the difference in the future of one’s business. But you won’t find those secrets in some blog. You won’t read about them in some industry magazine. You won’t hear them at some broker association meeting or in some little broker group. And those that are tweeting all day probably don’t have something valuable to tweet because if it was that valuable they wouldn’t be tweeting it.

You shouldn’t expect to find any secrets in this blog either. Because the good secrets – the ones that can bring in customers at a rapid pace – the ones that take weeks or months of thinking and years of planning and execution will not be found in the public domain. If you want to find the secrets you need to start looking in the right places. Sometimes those places are staring you right in the face but you don’t see them because your thinking has blinded your vision. In fact, close your eyes. And open your mind. Challenge your thinking. And stop looking on the outside because the answers will come from within. Because to win the game you may need to strike out the next batter. And it may not come from the 92-mph fastball. It may come from the 75-mph curve.

Webinar Invite – Growing Your Benefits Business by Leaps and Bounds


How does a broker go from 5 employees in their benefits firm in 2005 to 60 today without an acquisition? How does another go from 5 to 200 in just 8 years? Or another that generated $40 PEPM in addition to commission on a single account?

In this webinar we will get into the details of how some firms are skyrocketing while others struggle. We will show you the details of what these firms did to generate rapid growth, and show you how you can do the same.

This is a no-holds-barred webinar. If you want me to tell you what I think you are already thinking, then this is not for you. I am going to tell it like it is.

In this webinar we will answer the following:
• What are these brokers doing that is different?
• How they generate up to $20 PEPM above the regular commission?
• Why their model sustains any changes in healthcare reform?
• What is the difference between faking it and making it?
• The 3-year plan to a better future?

This webinar is a culmination of all others we have done. It puts things in a nice neat package and explains things in a different way. If you want to learn this formula, please click here to register.

Register HERE

The dates are September 9,13,and 16th at 12 noon eastern time.

This is for benefits brokers only.

Consumerism in Healthcare is Not Practical


I read a lot of articles about consumerism and how employees need to be better consumers. And as one who implements technology I am very familiar with most of the decision support tools in the market and all the online symptom checkers. So let me make a bold statement. It is all garbage. I have always thought that individuals will never have enough knowledge to make educated health care decisions. Health care is too complex and always changing so how am I ever going to have the time to keep my knowledge current. I don’t want to, trust me. And the last time I needed health care I was driving very quickly to the emergency room. Not a lot of time the think there.

I recently listened to a presentation that Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini gave a few years ago at Stanford. (you can see it here) The final question asked of him was as follows: “How do you create a more educated consumer in a marketplace where they are being directing their own health care decisions?” What surprised me was his answer.

“Trying to educate to everybody on how the health care system works and the level of detail isn’t going to work. Sorry to say. And the reason is that unless the amount of information I can gather is immediately available and that when I act on it has an immediate response I am not going to pay attention to it.”

With all the articles out there about consumerism and directing one’s own health care I thought I was the only one that had such view.

Every time I have my car fixed I am wondering whether I am getting ripped off. I don’t know enough about cars to “shop the market” for service. I remember watching 60 minutes or one of those shows where they show auto mechanics taking advantage of everyday consumers by doing things people didn’t need. That’s me. I wish I had a trusted auto consultant who would tell me whether I really need the services some mechanic is saying I need. You get my point. If I don’t know whether my car is getting the proper treatment how the heck am I expected to figure out whether my doctor is doing the right thing.

Just last night my wife and I had a debate about the value of multivitamins and we couldn’t even agree on whether they worked or were a waste of money. So I Googled the topic, read a bunch of articles, and still don’t know whether multivitamins work.

Let’s not confuse choosing health care versus choosing health insurance. When choosing health insurance is one supposed to be predicting what their needs are going to be in the next 12 months to essentially “game the deductible”? Insurance is supposed to protect one from an unanticipated event that may cause financial duress if one were not insured. Anything that doesn’t fit into this category is simply a reimbursement plan. Dental insurance is almost not insurance. It is a prepaid reimbursement plan for most. There should be two types of insurance plans. One that runs like dental and is simply discounted reimbursements, and another that is real insurance. It is for this reason health savings accounts should rule the day.

So what is the solution? I don’t like when people run around talking about the problems without giving viable solutions so I won’t do that myself. I always say that stating the problem is easy, it is the solutions that are tough. Let me start with what I would want as a consumer. I would want someone who would give me sound advice as to what is proper treatment. I want someone who has an incentive to do the right thing for me. I want someone who would spend my money as if it were their own.

I think the solution requires properly placing incentives. I want to live a healthy, happy, long, and financially viable life. I want someone advising me who understands my goals which I will safely say that these goals are more than likely shared by many. I am all about incentives. It is funny how when you have the right incentives you get better outcomes. That requires having someone who wants me to be healthy and not just fix me when I am broke. This sounds like the things I would want from my car consultant who would advise me on how to take care of my car. I want my car to last long, be healthy, and financially viable. I am not sure what a happy car would look like.

There are emerging models out there that will provide this type of service. And making consumer based decisions around the small stuff may become common. But as a means of controlling healthcare costs, no way. We all know that the majority of health care costs come from few people with chronic conditions. If I need to have my oil changed maybe I can shop the market. But if I need a new engine I would hope to have a very educated mechanic at my side to help me make the best decisions.

Participate in our 2016 HR/Benefits/Payroll Technology and Services Survey


HR Technology Advisors is conducting our 2016 National HR Technology survey for the small to mid-sized employer market. We conducted this survey two years ago with great success and we are doing it again. Much has changed since then. This survey will help benefits brokers and employers gain an understanding of the following:

• What employers are using for technology (HR/Benefits/Payroll/Time and Attendance/ACA)
• Satisfaction levels with their vendor
• Who is looking for new solutions
• Who they are moving to and who they are moving from
• What employers are looking for from a capability standpoint
• Who is deploying employee self-service via web and mobile
• Vendors employers are using for ACA Tracking
• And more…..

With old brokers and new brokers leading with some technology solution, many giving solutions away for free, we think it would be important to:

• Know what your clients have
• Know what your clients want
• Know who is shopping
• Find out what vendors employers are really using versus listening to the sales pitches from the vendors.
• Provide your clients with valuable market information

If you are a broker and want to participate you can do so by clicking on this link. There is a fee to sponsor the survey and personalize it for your firm. Considering all the money and time brokers are spending on evaluating and paying for technology this is worth it.

If you are an employer and would like to participate send me an email or give me a call. Contact information is below. I will send you a link to take the survey. A summary of the results will be provided when we close the survey.

Participants will be eligible to win a $500 Gift Certificate.

Brokers Click HERE to Participate

Contact information: Joe Markland – 508-530-5043 jmarkland@hrtadvisors.com