Are You Too Comfortable to Change?

I don’t hide the fact that I think the benefits world is going to change. And when giving presentations I often refer to a quote by Steve Case from his book the Third Wave that states “Incumbents often fail because they underestimate the speed at which the future is approaching.” But something became evident today when talking to a broker about some of the changes going on in the industry when I realized that he simply did not want to change. More likely he didn’t want to take risks. Not everyone is a risk taker. In fact, very few take big risks.

I have heard at least once, or maybe a hundred times, that benefits firms are struggling with organic growth. The thing about the benefits business is that it is getting commoditized. I hear it all the time. I don’t always hear it from the business owners or the producers living off of a block of business and referrals, but I do hear it from the young producers who are dialing for dollars and knocking on doors. They are begging for differentiators but often the owners are living in a different world. And from the owners’ seat many don’t see the different challenges between what the veterans and what the rookies are facing as it relates to the competitive market.

To be competitive in today’s world it is important to change. To have a unique value proposition that is not easily duplicated is important. But change often requires taking risks. As Mark Zuckerberg says, “In a world that is changing really quickly, the only strategy that is guaranteed to fail is not taking risks.”

The thing is few want to take risks. I have pointed out new competitive threats many times to brokers who did not act until they lost business. In fact, over 50% of our new clients lose business after hearing about a competitive threat and not taking action. Losing business is a pretty big motivator. Yet most won’t act until they feel the pain.

I had one broker tell me his clients or prospects didn’t want one of the new HR technologies. I couldn’t imagine every firm in his market thinking the same thing. Anyways, what I didn’t tell him was that the reason I was calling him was because I was working with an employer that told me she decided not to choose him as a broker because of his technology strategy. Brokers often know why they lose clients but often don’t know why they lose prospects, which was the case here. Do you know why you lose prospects?

I have had people read my articles and ridicule me because of the message. Often I am just pointing out that there are some out there who say the benefits business is going to change. Zenefits, Gusto, and Namely are changing it. The CEO of Aetna says it is going to change. The government may also want it to change. All are a threat to the status quo. Sometimes I think that people don’t want to know these things. It is like having a lump in your side and you don’t want to check it out because you may think something major is wrong. If you ignore it, it will go away. Well, I don’t think so.

Change doesn’t happen because you wake up one day and say “I’ve changed”. And change doesn’t happen because you stock your shelves with a few more products or services that are easily attained by anyone. I see many people “pretending” to change but not really changing. And I say, “not really” because the changes I imagine brokers need to make aren’t easy. Many brokers are choosing “easy”, thinking they have made big changes. If the change doesn’t make you feel uneasy. If it doesn’t appear to be very risky, then many will do it, and they do. Then you are not unique.

Personally I think there are big opportunities in the benefits business. I would say more so that I think there are big opportunities in the human capital management business of which the benefits is a piece. But to capitalize on those opportunities one must change. And this change requires taking risk. Big risks.

So you can stock your shelves with new toys. You can do all the sales training in the world.  But what if insurance commissions were cut in half on January 1st?  What if the government made individually based health insurance tax deductible? What if Zenefits, Gusto, Namely, and Paychex are right and employers will switch brokers for HR and Payroll technology and services? That would require the type of change I am talking about. And if some of these things happen and you “underestimate the speed at which change is approaching” could you survive?

I don’t want to over-generalize but I think we have an industry where taking big risks isn’t the norm. Protecting the status quo is. But there are big opportunities for those that really want to take some risks and Challenge the status quo. Feel a little uncomfortable. Work a little harder. And have a lot of fun along the way.

I am going to finish by saying our new business, ProHCM is all about challenging the status quo. It is taking a big risk. It is different, very different. We are betting on and preparing for a future that may be approaching faster than most anticipate. I am looking for the blue oceans. So I will finish with a quote from another FaceBook employee, the COO, Sheryl Sandberg, “If you’re offered a seat on a rocket ship, don’t ask what seat! Just get on.” It could be fun.

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